Last edited by Zululkis
Monday, November 2, 2020 | History

2 edition of The wetwood disease of elm found in the catalog.

The wetwood disease of elm

  • 96 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published in [Urbana .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesCircular / Illinois, state natural history survey -- 50, Circular (Illinois. Natural History Survey Division) -- 50
The Physical Object
Pagination19 p.
Number of Pages19
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24349350M
OCLC/WorldCa1404130


Share this book
You might also like
Displaced workers, 1979-83.

Displaced workers, 1979-83.

Meteorological measurements relevant in planning urban environments

Meteorological measurements relevant in planning urban environments

Eastside forest ecosystem health assessment.

Eastside forest ecosystem health assessment.

Design of flexible airfield pavements for multiple-wheel landing gear assemblies

Design of flexible airfield pavements for multiple-wheel landing gear assemblies

Girl chases boy

Girl chases boy

Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management Courses Taught in Alberta and British Columbia Columbia Colleges in the 1978-79 Academic Year.

Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management Courses Taught in Alberta and British Columbia Columbia Colleges in the 1978-79 Academic Year.

Who are the insiders?

Who are the insiders?

Student study guide to accompany Volk/Brown Basic microbiology 8th edition

Student study guide to accompany Volk/Brown Basic microbiology 8th edition

My pollys painting book.

My pollys painting book.

Contract between the United States of Colombia and the Panama Railroad Company as modified by the Columbian Congress.

Contract between the United States of Colombia and the Panama Railroad Company as modified by the Columbian Congress.

Constitution, Treaties & Laws of the Choctaw Nation

Constitution, Treaties & Laws of the Choctaw Nation

Mother Church of St. Mary, Newington Butts, Surrey

Mother Church of St. Mary, Newington Butts, Surrey

Fresh ink

Fresh ink

Oliver Twist

Oliver Twist

Cleghorns of Lanark

Cleghorns of Lanark

The wetwood disease of elm by J. Cedric Carter Download PDF EPUB FB2

Buy The wetwood disease of elm (Illinois. Natural History Survey Division Circular) on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders. Wetwood disease of elm. Urbana, Ill.: State of Illinois, Dept. of Registration and Education, Natural History Survey Division, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: J Cedric Carter; Illinois.

Natural History Survey Division. ' c' CUjP.C TheWetwoodDiseaseofElm CARTER WETWOOD isadisease,knownto occuralsoinmanyotherkindsoftrees,includingapple,birch. The wetwood disease of elm. Related Titles. Series: Circular (Illinois. Natural History Survey Division) ; 50 By.

Carter, J. Cedric (James Cedric), Type. Book. Material. Published material. Elm (Ulmus spp.)-Bacterial Wetwood | Pacific Northwest Pest Management Handbooks Elm (Ulmus spp.)-Bacterial Wetwood Cause Wetwood is associated with bacteria including Enterobacter nimipressuralis, Bacillus megaterium, and Pseudomonas sp.

Liquid accumulates in diseased tissue of the tree which is then colonized by the bacteria. This bulletin expands a previous report of the author's researches The wetwood disease of elm book wetwood of Elm, which has been shown to be due to a species of bacterium belonging to the genus Erwinia (nimipressuralis ).

[Cf. For. Abstr. 7 (No. ); 9 (No. KEYWORDS: Bacterial disease trees \ fungal diseases \ Ulmus americana diseases \ Wetwood. Feb 2, Bacterial wetwood sometimes called slime flux is a water-soaked condition of wood, occurring in the trunk, branches and roots of many shade and ornamental trees and more often trees over ten years old.

Wetwood is most prevalent in Siberian and American Elm but can attack numerous other trees. The disease occurs in the crotches or where there are wounds on trees.

This disease is a major cause of rot in the trunks and branches of hardwood trees. Slime flux is caused by a bacterial infection in the inner sapwood and outer heartwood areas of the tree and is normally associated with wounding or environmental stress, or both.

In elm trees, bacteria Enterobacter cloacae are the cause of slime flux, but numerous other bacteria have been associated with this. Bacterial Wetwood. Bacterial wetwood on elm (Ulmus) Bacterial wetwood, also known as slime flux, is caused by an infection of one or more of several bacteria.

It results in a water-soaked, oozing or bleeding condition of wood, which occurs in the trunk, branches and roots of shade and ornamental trees. It is normally not serious in most trees but is a chronic disease, which causes. The elms in our area commonly ooze from a disease known as Bacterial Wetwood or Slime Flux.

It does not kill the tree, but it can be a nuisance during the growing season as the tree drips water from the truck. I have attached a link to a fact sheet with more information. The branch connection shows that there may be included bark. Following an introduction to elms and their cultivation, a detailed account of biotic diseases includes wilts, yellows, bacterial wetwood, cankers, foliar diseases, root rot and damping-off, discoloration and decay, virus and virus-like diseases and mistletoe disease.

Abiotic diseases include nutrient deficiency, meteorological factors, chemical toxicity and mechanical damage. Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): (external link). Bacterial diseases; Bacterial wetwood/slime flux Enterobacter nimipressuralis = Erwinia nimipressuralis.

Bacillus megaterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Discoloration (xylem) Bacteria Elm. the causal agent-complex of wetwood disease on elm trees for the first time in the world. Keywords: Elm, wetwood, bacterial pathogens, molecular identification, East Azarbaijan.

Elm (Ulmus spp.) is a deciduous and semi-deciduous tree that belongs to the Ul-maceae family. These trees are well-known ornamental plants and because of having. native elm bark beetle (Hylurgopinus rufipes), a vector of the Dutch elm disease fungus.

I nfected pruning tools may also transmit bacteria from wetwood-infected to healthy tissue. Symptoms Within the trunk and larger limbs of elms, popl ars, and other trees, wetwood appears as a dark brown to. Common Names of Plant Diseases R.

Jay Stipes, primary collator (last update 3/8/93) BACTERIAL DISEASES Bacterial wetwood Enterobacter nimipressuralis (Carter) Brenner et al.

= Erwinia nimipressuralis Carter Bacillus megaterium de Bary Pseudomonas fluorescens Migula Discoloration (xylem) Bacteria Elm leaf scorch. Elm bark beetle and galleries associated with Dutch elm disease. Dutch elm disease. Dutch elm disease symptoms in xylem.

Wetwood ooze on trunk. Black leaf spot. Elm yellows - most leaves of canopy turn yellow at once. Elm yellows sometimes causes butterscotch yellowing of phloem.

Foliage wilt caused by wetwood often followed by dying bark of affected branches, especially in young elms (IL Natural History Survey photo). Figure 5. Brown streaks produced by wetwood in young sapwood of elm branches - can be confused with similar streaking caused by other wilt diseases of elm (IL Natural History Survey photo).

Bacterial wetwood The disease-producing organisms. Wetwood is a wilt disease that is thought to be caused by the gram-negative bacterium Erwinia nimipressuralis De Bary. However, such bacteria as Bacillus megaterium De Bary, Pseudomonas fluorescens Migula, and Clostridium sp.

also appear to be involved in the induction of the wetwood ly, different bacterial species that. Hosts, distribution, symptoms and signs, disease cycle, and control measures are described for 46 hardwood and 15 conifer diseases. Diseases in which abiotic agents are contributory factors also are described.

Color and black-and-white illustrations that stress diagnosis and control are provided. A Nightmare on Elm Street is an American horror franchise that consists of nine slasher films, a television series, novels, and comic films began with the film A Nightmare on Elm Street () created by Wes series revolves around the fictional character Freddy Krueger, a former child killer who after being burned alive by the vengeful parents of his victims, returns from.

disease. The microorganisms that have been associated with disease are commonly found in soils and probably enter through wounds above and below the soil line. Over a period of time, which may be several years, the number of microorganisms increases in the wood, causing the water-soaked symptoms of wetwood.

Large amounts of gases may. Do not prune elm trees between mid-April and mid-October. Disease, pests, and problems. European elm flea weevil is a minor problem. Wetwood can occur. Disease, pest, and problem resistance. Very good resistant to Dutch elm disease, elm yellows and elm leaf beetle.

Native geographic location and habitat. Of hybrid origin. Bark color and texture. It is associated with ring shake and honeycomb, two lumber defects.

Ring shake in elm leads to the term “onion elm” in the lumber trade. Another bad outcome of wetwood, which occurs in a small subset of species, is a condition known as slime flux [3, 6, 10]. This occurs when the gasses produced anaerobically by the bacteria cause pressure to build up, expelling the liquid, which may damage.

Dutch Elm Disease (fungus – Ceratocystis ulmi): Symptoms may appear on one or more branches on any part of the tree in contrast to phloem necrosis where tops of infected trees show first abnormalities. Leaves on individual branches wilt and turn yellow; in some instances leaves wilt very rapidly, dry out, then fall while still green.

Fortunately, the propagation of hybrid, disease-resistant trees shows promise. Elm claims about 20 species in the temperate regions of the world.

The most well known include the stately American elm (Ulmus Americana) and the slippery elm (Ulmus rubra) of the United States, and the English elm (Ulmus procera) in Europe and Great Britain.

The most common evidence of wetwood is bleeding or “fluxing” of sap from the trunk or larger limbs of a tree. Often this fluxing is associated with a wound, but has also been observed where no obvious wound existed. Bacteria associated with wetwood are common in soil and water Stain associated with bacterial wetwood disease on the trunk.

Bacterial wetwood most commonly affects elm and poplar, but can also be a serious problem on aspen, maple, and mulberry. Bacterial wetwood leads to discolored, rancid-smelling areas on tree trunks.

What does bacterial wetwood look like. Trees suffering from bacterial wetwood are characterized by having areas where liquid oozes from their trunks. Wetwood and slime flux are common on elm.

That disease complex was discussed in issue 4 of this newsletter. There is no control for wetwood, but it is not fatal to a tree. The bacteria associated with the infection are common in our soil and probably infect from the soil.

Most old elms in the state are infected with wetwood. Yes, bacterial wetwood is most common in maple, elm, oak, poplar and birch trees.

But, since so many different bacteria can spark wetwood, it can also happen to lots of other trees. Is bacterial wetwood harmful. Damage done by bacterial wetwood depends on the condition of your tree. For most trees, the stained bark is as bad as it gets. A year-old American elm tree stood condemned, finally succumbing, it seemed, to the disease that has killed off hundreds of thousands of other elms in.

Some bacteria target specific hosts. One example is Enterobactor cloacae, which is the causal agent of bacterial wetwood in elm. Species of Clostridium, Bacillus, Klebsiella, and Psedomonas have been identified as the causal agents in various other trees.

Disease Cycle. The disease cycle begins when bacteria infiltrate the sapwood. Tree disease control service — when performed by a certified Utah arborist — can help your trees overcome the effects of slime flux.

Also known as wetwood, slime flux is a common bacterial disease that infects many popular northern Utah species, including elm. Bacterial wetwood on ornamental trees Wet wood (or slime flux) is a common condition on poplar, elm, birch, maple, apple, mountain ash and other ornamental trees.

It is a disease described as wet wood. It is believed that wet wood is caused by some species of anaerobic soil bacteria, although the pathology of those bacteria is less investigated.

Bacterial wetwood most commonly affects elm and poplar, but can also be a serious problem on aspen, maple, and mulberry. What does bacterial wetwood look like. Trees suffering from bacterial wetwood are characterized by having areas where liquid oozes from their trunks.

bacterial diseases; introduction; disease: crown gall; disease: fire blight; disease: bacterial wetwood of elm; chapter vascular bacterial diseases; introduction; disease: elm yellows (elm phloem necrosis); disease: lethal yellowing of coconut palms; disease: ash yellows or ash witches'- broom; disease: leaf scorch of hardwoods; chapter Wetwood.

The main symptom of slime flux (often called wet wood) is the oozing of sour-smelling sap from the tree's trunk, cracks and branch crotches. The sap is more prevalent during the spring and early summer when the tree is growing more rapidly. The sap drips down the bark and causes a gray-white streaking on the trunk and branches.

The cedar elm is susceptible to Dutch Elm disease, wetwood, blackspot and anthracnose. Dutch Elm Disease. Dutch Elm disease has decimated the elm tree population. Cedar elms are not as affected as other elm species, but are still in danger.

The disease is a caused by a fungus that is spread by the elm bark beetle as it tunnels under the bark. Wetwood, or slime flux—Various microorganisms. Wetwood is caused by several species of bacteria; yeast organisms may also be involved.

Wetwood is especially common in elm and poplar, but it affects many other plants, including box elder, fruitless mulberry, hemlock, magnolia, maple, and oak. Would that be the same as slime flux. I have Insects and Diseases of Woody Plants but it must be an earlier edition (?) because there's no mention of a flux infection on p.

but I did find a reference to Bacterial Wetwood/Slime Flux on p of my book that sounds similar. Dutch elm disease is a widespread and often fatal disease to American elm trees.

It is often spread from tree to tree through roots that have grown together. Aphids, scale, leaf miners and elm leaf beetle are common insects that also plague American elms. The Siberian and Chinese elms are often confused.Elm trees (Ulmus spp.) are one of the most widespread landscape plants, widely used as ornamental trees to embellish parks and streets of different countries including trees cultivation is seriously limited by biotic factors such as bacterial pathogens.

Recently, bacterial wetwood has been identified as a common disease on elm trees in Northwest Iran.